Old Hill Street Police Station

Why join MCI?

At MCI, you will play a key role in forging a thriving digital future for Singapore.

You will help shape the future of Singapore’s digital economy; safeguard our interests in the digital age; catalyse the creation of our own innovations; empower individuals digitally; and mould our national narrative.

Together, we will write the next chapter of the Singapore Story.

  • Employee BenefitsEmployee Benefits

    At MCI, you will enjoy autonomy, flexibility, and a work environment tailored to help you innovate and do your best work; manage life’s many commitments; and look after your physical and mental well-being.

    In addition, you will enjoy:

      
    Learning and development
    • Job rotations
    • Sponsorship programmes for local, part-time certifiable courses leading to formal qualification
    • Opportunities for external postings, attachments and postgraduate scholarships at local and overseas universities
    • Study Leave for Preparing for Examinations
    Flexi Work benefits
    • Telecom allowances
    Health and medical benefits
    • Additional two per cent Medisave Contribution 
    • Subsidised Outpatient and Dental Treatment
    • Public Officers' Group Insurance Scheme (Opt-in basis) 
    Parental support benefits
    • Marriage Leave, Maternity and Paternity Leave
    • Child Sick Leave and Childcare Leave
    • Parent Care Leave
    Wellness and work-life harmony
    • Hybrid Work Arrangements
    • Government Holiday Bungalows
    • Gymnasium and Aerobic Facilities  
    Others
    • Meeting-free days for staff well-being and self-care
    • 24-Hour Counselling Hotline
    • Team Building Funds to keep the team spirit strong

  • Career DevelopmentCareer Development

    At MCI, we provide a rewarding career with many opportunities.

    The varied, complex challenges; inspiring leaders; and driven teammates whom you will work with will make you a sought-after professional.

    We also encourage you to #TakeChargeofYourCareer.

    From job rotations across the public service to attachments and secondments to other public and private sector organisations – you will have no lack of opportunities to develop and grow as a professional in MCI.

     

    Officers may be appointed on one of the following schemes of service:

    Information Officer

    A career in the Singapore Government Information Service is rewarding and challenging, spanning a broad gamut of portfolios and responsibilities that are fundamental to good governance. As the government's communications specialists, Information Officers have an important role to play in the entire value chain of governance from the formulation of policy, to its communication and delivery to the public, and the management of consequences arising from its implementation.

    Information Officers will have the opportunity to be posted to a variety of information management work in various Divisions, and be seconded to Government Ministries and Statutory Boards to help in the communication of policies and programmes.

    Young officers generally begin their careers in MCI where they receive formal professional and on-the-job training with rotations to divisions and affiliate attachments; or are seconded to serve in the corporate communications department in external government agencies. Experienced officers may be posted to government agencies to assume directorial positions in corporate communications departments or serve as Press Secretaries to Ministers.

    Language Executive

    Language Executives provide translation services to support the Government's public communications efforts.

    Management Executive

    The Management Executives are involved in a myriad of key functions, including policy formulation for info-communications and media development as well as driving organisational excellence initiatives.

    Management Executives will have the opportunity to be posted to a variety of portfolios such as policy, planning and corporate services in various Divisions, or be seconded to MCI Statutory Boards for the implementation of policies and programmes.

     

  • Our CultureOur Culture

    COREVALUES NEWOURMISSION NEW

    At MCI, we encourage you to Dare, Innovate, Learn and Collaborate.

    DARE NEW INNOVATE NEW LEARN NEW COLLABORATE NEW

     

    Take a tour of the MCI office.

Read about our officers and teams, and the impacts they make.
  • Alex Sharma

    Alex Sharma

    Senior Assistant Director (Tech Strategy & Plans), Technology Office

    Meet Alex Sharma, Senior Assistant Director (Tech Strategy & Plans), Technology Office, MCI



    Making sense of constantly evolving tech developments online takes a special team of committed ‘techies’. MCI’s Technology Office analyses issues relating to digital technologies in support of policy and strategy developments, and experiments with tech concepts and capabilities to tackle online harms.

    Alex Sharma started his public service career as a software engineer in the Defence Science & Technology Agency (DSTA). Today, he is part of the Technology Office in MCI, supporting policy divisions in making informed assessments of various tech-related issues, including 5G and beyond, AI, Cloud, Combatting Online Harms, Quantum, etc.

    We spoke with Alex Sharma to find out about his #LifeatMCI experience.

    Hi Alex! Tell us about your work in the Technology Office team.

    The Technology Office is a small team, so I’m involved in its various workstreams, in both tech sensemaking and tech development. This includes understanding the latest tech trends, and the opportunities and risks of various tech for MCI and Singapore.

    I also look out for tech capabilities that could combat online harm, for instance, ones that could augment the fact-checking process. This area is particularly challenging as it evolves rapidly, with new threats emerging and existing ones evolving. As such, I need to constantly keep myself up-to-date with the latest threats and identify possible tech capabilities to mitigate them.


    Photo by Kenji Soon, Senior Official Photographer, Ministry of Communications and Information

    Wow, that sounds challenging! So what is a typical work day like for you?

    There’s no such thing as a typical day in the Technology Office! The range of tech issues that I deal with is really broad, from the tech areas that I’ve mentioned above to ones that are suddenly cast in the spotlight, such as how Apple’s new App Tracking Transparency feature has impacted the digital ad-tech ecosystem, and future tech such as 6G and Quantum.

    We are constantly building our networks so that we can reach out to the right experts to understand the crux of issues and elicit tech strategies to mitigate them. I find these conversations particularly useful as they produce insights that you would probably not be able to ‘Google’. MCI has established networks with other ministries and global consultancies too, which is extremely helpful in letting me appreciate issues beyond the tech perspective.

    My teammates and I also consult and guide one another on issues, as it is difficult for one to be a subject matter expert in all tech areas. In the Technology Office, we possess varying backgrounds – some of us are more familiar with the risks of tech, while others are more familiar with growing the tech industry, and this diversity allows us to tackle different issues that require tech expertise.

    Are there any misconceptions that people might have about the work that your team does?

    Sometimes, people may think that the Technology Office is yet another IT division, but the issues that we look at tend to be more strategic with implications to Singapore’s national security, economy, and way of life. Another interesting fact about the Technology Office is that its roots lie in the experimentation of tech concepts and capabilities, so we are also familiar with software prototyping.


    Photo by Kenji Soon, Senior Official Photographer, Ministry of Communications and Information

    What do you feel is the most enjoyable aspect of your work?

    I enjoy seeing colleagues from the policy divisions appreciate what goes on ‘under the hood’, understanding the opportunities and risks that tech brings, ultimately enabling informed policymaking.

    On a personal level, I find the experience of engaging a wide range of stakeholders, from software developers to the research community, local and global start-ups and companies, and the senior management team, enriching. These interactions allow me to grow tremendously. 

    Beyond work, what do you enjoy doing?

    I spend my free time with family and friends.

    I’m also a bit of a petrol head and am intrigued by the engineering in fast cars. I’ve been volunteering for the Motor Sports Singapore (MSS) since 2016, which got me involved in the Singapore Grand Prix. That is cancelled for now due to COVID-19. But I did get the chance to marshal in four Grand Prix events – three in Singapore and one in Melbourne, Australia.


    Photograph of Alex marshalling at the Australian Grand Prix in 2017

    What advice would you give someone applying for a role in your department?

    You definitely need to be open to ideas, be adaptable and be willing to learn new things. As tech evolves rapidly, you also need to constantly keep up-to-date.

    You also need to be able to translate technical knowledge in layman’s terms to the non-tech-savvy, perhaps through analogies.

    Lastly, what is one interesting fact about MCI that people might not know about?

    I used to think that MCI was just a ministry that focuses only on communications work. But the reality is that it is big on digitalisation. For example, the various Go Digital initiatives have really been instrumental in the face of COVID-19.

    If what you read interests you, join MCI to write the next chapter of Singapore’s digital future!

  • Nur Azhar

    Nur Azhar

    Deputy Director, International Affairs Division

    Meet Nur Azhar Bin Ayob, Deputy Director at the International Affairs Division, MCI

    At the International Affairs Division (IAD), Azhar and his team develop policies, strategise engagements and forge partnerships to advance and safeguard Singapore’s interests in the digital space. Whether it’s inking bilateral and multilateral agreements to better coordinate the response to digital issues, or creating new opportunities for digital economy cooperation, you can be sure that IAD has had a hand in all of it.

    Azhar is a former law-enforcement officer who brings his expertise in safety and security to his role as Deputy Director of IAD to help MCI navigate and manage a new and fast-evolving international digital landscape.

    We spoke with Azhar to find out about his #LifeatMCI experience.

    Hi Azhar! Tell us about your work at IAD.

    I am involved in MCI’s international engagements. In partnership with other divisions in MCI and our Statutory Boards, we formulate, communicate and advance MCI’s interests across a range of areas in the digital domain, and across bilateral, multilateral and industry forums.

    I also oversee the team handling the operational aspects of international engagements, e.g. proactively planning and managing bilateral meetings and participating at international events to advance our overall international strategy.

    Photo by Kenji Soon, Senior Official Photographer, Ministry of Communications and Information

    What is a typical work day like for you?

    There is no typical day at IAD, which is something I really enjoy! On a day to day, we advise our divisions and partner agencies on foreign policies for the digital domain. This includes assessing how we could work with the United Nations and other countries on Digital Economy, Digital Society and Digital Government matters. The latter is done in partnership with the Smart Nation and Digital Government Office.

    We also specialise in policy issues for areas like Artificial Intelligence and Cybersecurity, which allow us to help our internal stakeholders identify relevant risks or opportunities.

    Working in IAD also entails working outside of the normal work hours. It helps that I have a strong support system and an understanding family to help balance these demands.

    Photograph of Azhar at an international engagement in 2021

    Are there any misconceptions that people might have about the work that your team does?

    We tend to be perceived as the travel experts of arranging international meetings! We are expected to know about travel arrangements in all countries, but this is not strictly within our realm of expertise.

    Another misconception is that working with foreign partners will be the same as how we work across the Singapore government, which may not be the case. There is a need for us to work efficiently with countries with different priorities. This requires an investment of active engagement and interactive dialogue; as well as an investment of time and energy. COVID-19 has also made arranging face-to-face meetings challenging. Some of our counterparts also have summer holidays as well as cultural aspects that require us to navigate around. All in all, the work that we do in IAD will give an added layer of cross-cultural and foreign policy capability especially as MCI’s work in the digital domain becomes more connected to developments in the international digital landscape.

    What do you enjoy most about your work?

    For me, the most rewarding part is knowing that the work that we do at IAD has a real significance for the economy, businesses, and society as a whole. It also serves to enhance Singapore’s reputation internationally as a digitally savvy nation and digital hub in Asia.

    Coming from law enforcement, MCI’s portfolio was completely new to me. It has been a steep learning curve but I have learnt to adjust and adapt. I’m grateful to my supervisors for their patience and support through the transition.

    Photo by Kenji Soon, Senior Official Photographer, Ministry of Communications and Information

    What do you enjoy doing outside of work?

    I became a new father around the same time I joined MCI, so this takes up every waking hour outside of my work commitments. I try to spend as much quality time as I can with family and close friends, bonding over a meal or exchanging parenting tips whenever possible. I also try to be as active as I was previously, as the pandemic has curtailed my love of the outdoors, having to avoid large crowds especially with a baby in hand.

    What advice would you give someone applying for a role in your department?

    You need to be interested in the range of policy areas helmed by MCI. You will also need to be aware of geopolitical developments and ready to contribute to making Singapore an international digital hub.

    One must also have a mindset to learn and explore new perspectives as the digital domain is fast-evolving and never static. This can be uncomfortable at times, but it also makes our work pioneering!

    Being comfortable with meeting people is also important, as we work with various parties around the world.

    Lastly, be prepared to travel. It’s good to have the opportunity to travel, deliver the outcomes from work trips and see how our counterparts in other countries work. I have always treasured my network of international contacts, some of whom have become close friends.

    Lastly, what is one interesting fact about MCI that people might not know about?

    I love the fact that the current MCI building used to be a police station – the former Hill Street Police Station. It feels as though I’m still working in a police establishment and that I will always have a connection to the police force in one way or another! Policing was a huge part of my life and I will always be proud of the work my brothers and sisters in blue do, every single day and night.

    Join MCI and help transform Singapore into a global digital hub!

  • Vanessa Wilfred

    Vanessa Mei Jun Wilfred

    Senior Assistant Director, Economic Regulation Division

    Meet Vanessa Mei Jun Wilfred, Senior Assistant Director, at the Economic Regulation Division, MCI



    To future-proof our plans for Singapore, MCI’s Economic Regulation Division (ERD) oversees regulations and policies around the rapidly evolving telecommunication sector and digital infrastructure to ensure that Singapore’s connectivity is world-class, secure, and resilient.

    Photo by Kenji Soon, Senior Official Photographer, Ministry of Communications and Information

    If you are looking for a meaningful role in the civil service to drive policy around the digital economy, read on to find out what it is like to be a policymaker at MCI.

    We spoke with Vanessa to find out about her personal #LifeatMCI experience.

    Hi Vanessa. Tell us about your role here in MCI.

    I lead a small team at ERD that develops policies impacting digital infrastructure in Singapore, including the rollout of 5G networks, Cloud and data centres. The rollout of 5G networks is a big milestone for Singapore’s connectivity. I find it meaningful to be part of the team laying the groundwork for Singapore’s digital future.

    What is it like working in your team?

    There is a really collaborative culture here at MCI, which I especially love. Within the team, we complement each other’s strengths and weaknesses. Some of us are great networkers and strong analysts, while others are careful and meticulous planners. I really appreciate how we are always ready to help each other to learn and improve along the way. 


    Photo by Kenji Soon, Senior Official Photographer, Ministry of Communications and Information

    What challenges do you face at work and how do you overcome them?

    The issues we deal with are new and emerging, so we don’t have many case studies or precedents to fall back on. But this is part and parcel of what we do given the fast-evolving digital domain. Sometimes, it requires patience and perseverance, and also some detours before we find our way.

    I believe in self-help. If there are times it seems we are going in circles, I feel responsible to propose solutions on how we can move forward. Over time, I have learnt not to worry about things that I cannot control, and to shift my attention to the many other things I can contribute towards. 

    What motivates you to go to work every day?

    Learning something new every day. I enjoy listening to insightful views at meetings and engaging in deep discussions. Before we started working from home, I always looked forward to connecting with my team, colleagues from MCI and agencies over lunch.


    Photo by Kenji Soon, Senior Official Photographer, Ministry of Communications and Information

    What is your favourite memory in MCI so far?

    I would say it is the friendships formed. Policy making is deeply meaningful work, and I enjoy working alongside my colleagues.

    One of my most memorable projects is developing the 5G ecosystem in Singapore. I feel challenged as 5G is a multi-faceted issue that requires us to understand not only the technology, but also track economic, security and even geopolitical developments around the world. It was an eye-opening experience for me, and we have only just started.

    What advice do you have for those who are keen to drive policies in the digital domain?

    You need to be constantly curious and have a love for learning. Information becomes outdated very quickly in the digital domain, so you have to read widely and engage many people to stay updated. 

    Lastly, tell us one little-known fact about you that you wish more people knew.

    I took up a new hobby during the pandemic, which is embroidery. I find it very meditative to sew one stitch at a time, and it also serves as a break for me from all things digital. It’s also nice to go back to my roots since I come from a family of tailors! 


    Photograph of Vanessa’s embroidery of a unicorn for her daughter

    If you’re keen to create a thriving digital future for Singapore through forward-looking policies, take the plunge and join us today!  

  • Darren Wong

    Darren Wong

    Intern at the Futures Unit

    Meet Darren Wong, Intern at the Futures Unit, MCI

    Darren Wong Banner

    The cross-divisional Futures Unit anticipates and analyses emerging trends, opportunities, and threats so that MCI is informed and better prepared for the future.

    Darren is a Geography graduate from Cambridge University, who completed a 5-month internship with the Futures Unit in MCI.

    Darren Wong 1Photo by Kenji Soon, Senior Official Photographer, Ministry of Communications and Information

    If you are looking for a meaningful internship in the Civil Service, read on to find out what it’s like to intern at MCI.

    We spoke with Darren Wong to find out more of his personal #LifeatMCI experience.

    Hi Darren! What made you apply for an internship at MCI?

    Having completed an internship in the Futures Unit at the Prime Minister’s Office, I jumped at the opportunity to intern at MCI to gain new experiences in this new and exciting field.

    What was your internship experience at the MCI Futures Unit like?

    I was involved in two projects during my internship with MCI: one on disinformation, which we are all becoming too familiar with; and the other on identity politics. The latter involved studying the varied viewpoints of different demographics, their info consumption and dissemination habits.

    Darren Wong 2Photo by Kenji Soon, Senior Official Photographer, Ministry of Communications and Information

    That sounds like interesting work! What were the key highlights of your internship?

    I was given the opportunity to intern at MCI, even while studying overseas although I flew back to Singapore midway through my internship in January 2021 due to the COVID-19 pandemic. I really enjoyed the opportunities to conduct in-person presentations and appreciated that those I presented to, including Ministers, MCI’s Permanent Secretary and Directors saw value in the work that I was doing.

    Darren Wong 3
    Photo by Kenji Soon, Senior Official Photographer, Ministry of Communications and Information

    What were your biggest takeaways from your internship?

    I learnt the importance of knowing your audience and pitching ideas in a way that is understandable and palatable. As futures work is complex, the information we present may be hard to understand. So, there is a need to frame it in a reader-centric way.

    How would you describe MCI to your peers?

    MCI was a really enjoyable place to work at. My colleagues were very kind to show me around the MCI office and even helped me with preparations prior to my presentations. It was a fun experience. As a Ministry, MCI is future-driven, so everyone is open to new perspectives. It’s a dynamic and positive place to work.

    Any advice for students or fresh graduates interested to intern at MCI?

    I would say go for it! Don’t expect the work to be easy, but don’t be afraid to ask for help when you need it. You won’t be expected to know everything. I was fortunate to have very good mentors during my internship.

    Lastly, tell us something interesting about yourself!

    Firstly, I ran a half marathon while studying at Cambridge University. It was a fantastic experience. Families living along the route in the university town came out of their houses and lined the roads to cheer us on and gave us the much-needed support and motivation to keep going.

    Darren Wong 4
    Photograph of Darren running at the Cambridge Half Marathon

    Secondly, I hope to be working in the Civil Service after I complete my studies. But first, I’ll be pursuing my Master’s in the super tech-driven state of California!

    Interested in an internship at MCI? Apply as an #MCIIntern today!

     

  • Joyce Kua

    Joyce Kua

    Senior Assistant Director at the Industry Division

    Meet Joyce Kua, Senior Assistant Director at the Industry Division, MCI

    Joyce Kua Banner

    MCI’s Industry Division (IND) works to bolster Singapore’s digital economy and establish Singapore as a global node for digital innovation. Joyce and her team partner other agencies and stakeholders to unlock the benefits of digitalisation for companies, both big and small.

    Joyce Kua 1
    Photo by Kenji Soon, Senior Official Photographer, Ministry of Communications and Information

    If you would like to play a pivotal role in helping Singapore and Singaporeans seize opportunities in the digital age, read on to find out what it is like to be part of the IND team.

    We spoke with Joyce from IND to find out about her #LifeatMCI.

    Hi Joyce! Tell us about your work at IND.

    Our work at IND is extremely wide-ranging: from helping businesses go digital to promoting research and development in up-and-coming digital technologies to strengthening the pipeline for tech talent.

    Since the COVID-19 pandemic hit, we have extended funding support through the Productivity Solutions Grant (PSG) to help over 63,000 SMEs go digital (as of March 2021).

    In the longer term, we are looking to grow Singapore’s capabilities in technology areas such as artificial intelligence (AI), communications & connectivity, trust technologies (TrustTech) and cybersecurity, just to name a few. Today, we are already seeing how 5G technology can transform sectors. This is an exciting time and will bring many opportunities.

    Lastly, growing a strong tech talent pipeline is important if we want to realise our digital ambitions as a nation.

    What is a typical workday like?

    It is hard to describe a typical day as the work at IND is so varied. But most days involve working closely with internal and external stakeholders to chart the roadmaps for digital innovation and industry transformation.

    We also spend a great amount of time talking to tech companies, so that we have a good pulse of what companies are thinking about. For example, exchanging ideas on AI and machine learning technologies, as well as the ethics surrounding the use of such technologies.

    Joyce Kua 2
    Photo by Kenji Soon, Senior Official Photographer, Ministry of Communications and Information

    Are there any misconceptions that people might have about the work that your team does?

    People tend to associate MCI with Government communications. That continues to be a big part for sure, but our mandate has grown over the years: we now think about how we can grow a dynamic and inclusive digital future for Singapore. And while IND’s focus is on industry development, it is increasingly hard to delink economic considerations from geopolitical, security and social considerations. So, we do spend quite a bit of time navigating issues at the nexus of these considerations and assessing the trade-offs that we may need to make.

    What is the most enjoyable aspect of your work?

    There is so much to enjoy about my work! Given the multi-faceted nature of the issues we deal with, we get to participate in extremely rich and thought-provoking discussions with a wide range of stakeholders from both the Public and Private sectors.

    Looking at the past five to ten years, we have seen tremendous developments in the technology space. For example, the rise of social media and business-to-consumer (B2C) products in the e-commerce and ride hailing space has transformed the way we consume, interact, and play. Imagine what the years ahead will bring as we experiment with new technologies such as AI and 5G, and the digital opportunities that we can uncover for Singapore and Singaporeans.

    Joyce Kua 3
    Photo by Kenji Soon, Senior Official Photographer, Ministry of Communications and Information

    What do you enjoy doing outside of work?

    I’ve always loved dining out and discovering new F&B joints. While it’s been a challenging time for the F&B sector, it’s been heartening to see ground-up movements aimed at helping hawker stalls and eateries.

    I’ve also developed a newfound appreciation for the outdoors, discovering park connector networks and various hiking trails, such as the Green Corridor.

    Joyce Kua 4Photo of Joyce at the Clementi Forest

    What advice would you give someone who is applying for a role in your department?

    An avid interest in current affairs across different domains is important, especially given the rapid pace of developments that continue to shape Singapore’s digital future.

    You also need to be able to embrace ambiguity and be proactive in wanting to drive outcomes. As we experiment with new technologies, it’s hard to predict how things will turn out, so being okay with taking chances and accepting that there are no right or wrong decisions is important.

    Lastly, what is one interesting fact about MCI that people might not know about?

    Everyone asks about the building we work in as it is so iconic. You’ll always hear “You know the building opposite Clarke Quay with the colourful windows?” Well, a fun fact is that the Old Hill Street Police Station has 927 windows, all painted in rainbow colours as part of the building’s restoration works in 1997. I guess you could say we were “Instagram-ready” even before Instagram existed!

    If what you read interests you, join MCI to help Singapore and Singaporeans seize opportunities in the digital age!

  • Jasmine Leng

    Jasmine Leng

    Assistant Director (Tech Strategy & Plans) at the Technology Office

    Meet Jasmine Leng, Assistant Director (Tech Strategy & Plans) at the Technology Office, MCI

    Jasmine Leng Banner

    MCI’s Technology Office leverages data and technology to chart the next bound for smart cities, general communications, and other areas.

    Jasmine brings fresh perspectives to her role as Assistant Director at the Technology Office with her past experience working in the start-ups space.

    Jasmine Leng 1
    Photo by Kenji Soon, Senior Official Photographer, Ministry of Communications and Information

    If you are interested on how technology impacts our lives, read on to find out what it is like to be making sense of this fast-moving area at MCI.

    We spoke with Jasmine to find out more about her personal #LifeatMCI experience.

    Hi Jasmine! Which aspects of TO’s work are you most excited about?

    I’m excited that our work covers the latest in tech, such as Artificial Intelligence (AI), Internet of Things (IoT), and guides how they could be developed and adopted across multiple industries. One highlight was setting up a Research, Innovation and Enterprise (RIE) 2025 programme to fund technology solutions to combat online harms.

    Can you share some of your short- and long-term goals for the TO team?

    In the short term, I’m looking forward to building a fuller picture of how digital technology impacts social, economic and geopolitical aspects of our lives. To facilitate this, we engage actively with our statutory boards, tech companies and research partners. All these entities have valuable and unique insights, which are important to support this process.

    In the longer term, increased involvement in MCI’s inter-agency projects would be fascinating. I believe that good ideas can be built upon and amplified through collaborative work, such that the sum of its parts can impact how we support a resilient and vibrant digital tech ecosystem, including having more successful local tech companies from Singapore.

    Jasmine Leng 2
    Photo by Kenji Soon, Senior Official Photographer, Ministry of Communications and Information

    What do you think it takes to succeed in TO?

    I’d say two important traits are focus and interest. Keeping focused on our goals helps us determine what is relevant so that we can stay on track. Secondly, with the tech space constantly evolving, the amount of information to process may seem overwhelming, so having an interest in tech is helpful.

    Before joining MCI, what professional experience did you have to prepare yourself for the work you are currently doing?

    I’ve been keen to immerse myself in tech since my time in Silicon Valley. It was a great experience to have close access and exposure to the movers and shakers in the tech scene then, including start-up founders, venture capitalists, software engineers and best-in-class academics. When I returned to Singapore, I wanted to apply my knowledge and contribute to the local tech scene here. Having worked in areas relating to corporate accelerators, tech start-up investments and talent acquisition, I’m glad to be with MCI, building tech strategies and plans to support upcoming technology investments in Singapore.

    Jasmine Leng 3
    Photo of Jasmine during her time in San Francisco

    What would you say new hires can look forward to when they join the team?

    You will have a hand in shaping Singapore’s tech strategies!

    We’ve all seen, the different viewpoints expressed online around vaccinations during this COVID-19 pandemic, for example. Part of our job is to look to tech to identify malicious intent and  prevent a distortion of reality. Apart from that, our team is made up of smart and motivated individuals. We have senior representatives on our team including our Director, Chief Technical Advisor and Senior Advisor, who come with a wealth of experience and interesting backgrounds. I’ve gained so much knowledge from them.

    Jasmine Leng 4
    Photo by Kenji Soon, Senior Official Photographer, Ministry of Communications and Information

    Lastly, tell us one little-known fact about you that you wish more people knew.

    In my leisure time, I love listening to podcasts. I prefer podcasts over social media, so that I can actively choose content that interests me.

    Keen to be a part of the MCI Family? Apply with us today!

Officers may be appointed on one of the following schemes of service:

Information Officer

A career in the Singapore Government Information Service is rewarding and challenging, spanning a broad gamut of portfolios and responsibilities that are fundamental to good governance. As the government’s communications specialists, Information Officers have an important role to play in the entire value chain of governance from the formulation of policy, to its communication and delivery to the public, and the management of consequences arising from its implementation.
 
Information Officers will have the opportunity to be posted to a variety of information management work in various Divisions, and be seconded to Government Ministries and Statutory Boards to help in the communication of policies and programmes.
 
Young officers generally begin their careers in MCI where they receive formal professional and on-the-job training with rotations to divisions and affiliate attachments; or are seconded to serve in the corporate communications department in external government agencies. Experienced officers may be posted to government agencies to assume directorial positions in corporate communications departments or serve as Press Secretaries to Ministers.

Language Executive

Language Executives provide translation services to support the Government’s public communications efforts. 

Management Executive

The Management Executives are involved in a myriad of key functions, including policy formulation for info-communications and media development as well as driving organisational excellence initiatives.

Management Executives will have the opportunity to be posted to a variety of portfolios such as policy, planning and corporate services in various Divisions, or be seconded to MCI Statutory Boards for the implementation of policies and programmes.